Emergency ID stickers a must

Vital information: Emergency ID was founded by former Police Officer, Nicole Graham, who had seen firsthand the need for vital patient information to be immediately accessible in emergency situations. The stickers are designed to be displayed on child seats, inside car doors and glove-boxes.

AS thousands of families hit the road during the peak holiday period, an Australian company has developed a simple yet effective way to provide Emergency Services personnel with critical patient information at the scene of serious accidents.

See your ad here

See your ad here
Emergency ID Australia has released a range of vehicle stickers for child seats, glove-boxes and inside car doors designed to alert paramedics and police to potentially life-saving information about a vehicle's occupants such as illnesses, medications, allergies and next of kin details.

Founder and Director of Emergency ID Australia Nicole Graham said despite the reduction in the national holiday road toll this was not a time to be complacent, with road crashes responsible for approximately 1,400 deaths and 32,500 serious injuries each yeari.

"According to the National Road Safety Strategy 2011-2020, an average of 4 people are killed and 90 are seriously injured on Australian roads every dayii, so it's important that we make it easier for the Emergency Services to better care for us when we need it most," Mrs Graham said.

"All it takes is to fill out important medical information about you and your loved ones and place the sticker somewhere prominent - whether you are having a family holiday, commuting to work, or if driving is your occupation.

"In the event of an accident the people involved may be seriously injured or in shock and unable to pass on critical details about themselves or others to Emergency Services personnel."

The Emergency ID Vehicle Stickers come in three sizes to suit individuals, small or large families and can be used in cars, trucks and caravans.

"For truck drivers who may have pre-existing health issues, for caravanning couples who require certain medications, or for families who have children with anaphylaxis or allergic reactions these simple stickers could be a life saver," Mrs Graham said.

"These products are designed to act as a backup to wearing Emergency ID medical jewellery, which can be engraved with vital health details and provide access to important medical information via a 24 hour call service."

Emergency ID has Australia's largest range of medical ID bracelets, necklaces, key rings, lanyards, wallet cards, stickers and wrist bands. The business has launched an Emergency ID App for Apple and Android smartphones, which displays critical medical and contact details on a phone's locked screen. Emergency ID Australia is Ausbuy accredited and Nicole Graham is a Board Member of Ausbuy.

For more information visit: www.emergencyid.com.au