It’s important that everyone including family, friends, teachers, childcare staff and work colleagues knows where their medical kit is and what they need to do in case of emergency”

MEDIA RELEASE FEBRUARY 2013

Medical pouches provide a safer return to school or work

For thousands of children with severe food allergies, diabetes and epilepsy, the back-to-school essentials aren’t limited to new notebooks and lunchboxes but also life-saving medical pouches packed with vital medications, adrenalin pens and emergency action plans.

In response to requests received via social media, Emergency ID Australia has released a set of easily identifiable medical pouches that list a person’s critical allergies or illness information and carry all their vital medical items for quick access in an emergency.

Founder and Director of Emergency ID Australia Nicole Graham said with one in ten people suffering from food allergies , 1.7 million people living with diabetes and 230,000 with epilepsy , there may be someone in every school or workplace that suffers from anaphylaxis, seizures or other life-threatening illness.

“It’s important that everyone including family, friends, teachers, childcare staff and work colleagues knows where their medical kit is and what they need to do in case of emergency,” Mrs Graham said.

“This is important for children starting at a new school or going into a class with a new teacher, especially where various medications belonging to numerous children are stored together and must be matched to the right child quickly without confusion.”

Mrs Graham understands personally the need for people to keep their information and medication in one pouch after a young lady with epilepsy suffered a seizure while visiting her house recently.

“She managed to signal to her backpack, which her partner then emptied out all over the floor and sifted through everything to try and find what she needed,” Mrs Graham said. “It occurred to me that if she had an easily recognisable and accessible medical kit then it would have been much easier and quicker for us to provide the assistance she needed.”

Mrs Graham said the social media community had played a large part in designing the pouches.

“We asked people exactly what they needed and incorporated their ideas into the design including bright colours, clear labelling, carabiner for clipping to bags, heat and water resistance, and space for medical information and a photo card,” Mrs Graham said.

“The response has been overwhelming, with parents in particular saying the pouches have given them greater peace of mind that their child will be safer when they send them off to school.”