Emergency ID Australia is well known around Australia. Here are some media items that may interest you.

All media enquiries to: Nicole Graham Founder & Director director@emergencyid.com.au 1300 369 142 or,

Our media relations consultant:
Michelle Parker of Parker Communications www.newmancommunications.com.au 0412 044 471 michelle@newmancommunications.com.au

We are PROUD of our products, outstanding reputation and award winning customer service. We even encourage you to compare us to our competitors, MedicAlert and Universal Medical ID, by viewing the comparison table on our home page. We thank you for supporting a 100% Founded, Owned & Operated AUSTRALIAN business that sends Emergency ID WORLDWIDE!

2014 EXCELLENCE IN INNOVATION

Being independently judged and recognised for our achievements in Excellence in Innovation means a great deal to myself and all our extended team. We are continually striving to excel and lead our field.

2014 EXCELLENCE IN INNOVATION
MID NORTH COAST BUSINESS AWARDS

The Excellence in Innovation award recognises businesses that have made significant contributions to their industry through the introduction or improvement of an idea, method, technology, process or application.

WINNER: Emergency ID Australia.

Emergency ID Australia is a world leader in medical jewelry and emergency ID products.

They have been distributing nationally for nine years and now sell internationally from their office in Wauchope. Emergency ID Australias range has the ability to relay vital information about a patient if involved in an accident or medical incident. Hundreds of thousands of people wear or carry Emergency Id and experience the peace of mind their service provides.

In the past year they have increased their turnover by 23% by being innovative and introducing the worlds first Emergency ID APP. A new initiative is the Emergency ID SPOT program, a new patient information program designed to improve emergency care for people involved in car crashes or suffering serious illnesses at home. The "SPOTS‟ can be placed on a car or in a home and contain vital medical information which helps to ensure emergency treatment is administered within the first 60 minutes of a serious accident. Their initiatives have created great media and public interest, with their Facebook following increasing from 18000 to 40000 in the past 12 months.

“Being independently judged and recognised for our achievements in Excellence in Innovation means a great deal to myself and all our extended team. We are continually striving to excel and lead our field.

To be recognised for this gives us a real pat on the back and acknowledgment that we truly leaders in innovation. It's a great honour and stamp of approval.

Thank YOU NSW Business Chamber, your support of businesses is essential to not just our individual business but to the Australian economy and the ongoing effect we have on creating success, jobs and local spending”

said Nicole Graham, Founder and Director, Emergency ID Australia.

Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine (ASEM) endorses Emergency ID Spot!

The Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine (ASEM) considers Emergency ID Spots a great initiative for both patients, Emergency Service providers and Emergency Departments. Having access at first contact to important information that may not otherwise be supplied, can be life saving.

“The Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine (ASEM) considers Emergency ID Spots a great initiative for both patients, Emergency Service providers and Emergency Departments. Having access at first contact to important information that may not otherwise be supplied, can be life saving”

The Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine (AMEM) is the founding organisation for Emergency Medicine in Australia and New Zealand.

Emergency ID SPOT receives large media coverage Australia wide.

Emergency ID Spot popular Australia Wide

Armed with immediate information about a patient’s allergies, medications and conditions, emergency services can provide the very best medical care on the spot. We wish everyone had the Emergency ID Spot in their vehicles and in their homes. This simple sticker will certainly help save lives,” Richard Jones General Manager Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

Lifesaving emergency information now available ON THE SPOT.

A new patient information program designed to improve emergency care for people involved in car crashes or suffering serious illness at home has been released in Australia, following the success of similar programs in the United States which have been credited with saving thousands of lives.

Emergency ID Spots, which are endorsed by the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service, are placed on a vehicle’s rear window or the front door of a house to alert police, paramedics and other first responders that a patient’s critical health information can be found inside, either in the glove box, on the sun visor or on the fridge.

The information, such as allergies, prescription medications, previous surgeries, pre-existing conditions and other vital information can ensure the best emergency treatment is administered during the ‘golden hour’ – the first 60 minutes or so after a serious accident or acute health event which can often mean the difference between life and death.

By including a photograph, emergency services personnel can check who the information relates to, while the inclusion of a list of emergency contact and next of kin details mean your loved ones can be informed immediately.

Founder and director of Emergency ID Australia, Nicole Graham, said as a former police officer she had come across countless people who were unconscious, disoriented or in so much pain they were not able to pass on critical information to carers.

“Three million drivers reported being in a car accident in the last five years in Australia* – and even in less serious crashes people often go into shock, which means they find it hard to remember important details or communicate clearly,” Ms Graham said.

“If you or your loved ones have a serious allergy to medications, a heart condition, diabetes or epilepsy for example, you can rely on the Emergency ID Spot to tell emergency services that vital information, even if you can’t.”

The Emergency ID Spots have received the backing of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service. General Manager Richard Jones said his organisation had thrown its support behind this initiative.

“Armed with immediate information about a patient’s allergies, medications and conditions, emergency services can provide the very best medical care on the spot. We wish everyone had the Emergency ID Spot in their vehicles and in their homes. This simple sticker will certainly help save lives,” Mr Jones said.

Ms Graham said she expected the Emergency ID Spots would be particularly popular with seniors, travellers and grey nomads.

“As people get older they are more likely to have multiple medical conditions, take medication routinely, and be more vulnerable to critical injury in an accident, or likely to suffer a serious medical problem at home,” Ms Graham said.

“The Spots are also expected to prove valuable for transport and trucking companies and other professional drivers. They also provide peace of mind for families who need to know their children will receive proper care if the parents are unable to pass on life saving information.”

Emergency ID Australia will donate $1 of the Spot sales to the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

A YouTube video showing the benefits of the program has been released today: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RdD78o29DOk

Focus Magazine Interview with Nicole Graham - Founder & Director of Emergency ID Australia

Nicole Graham Founder of Emergency ID Australia interview with Focus Magazine.

We've since grown to offer the largest range in Australia, with over 200 products. We have a national office and showroom staffed by a fantastic team in Wauchope, and we send thousands of items Australia wide.

Energetic entrepreneur Nicole Graham has faced a number of challengers in her career and personal life - but this go-getter has met each struggle head on and grown stronger as a result. She now dedicates her award-winning business to helping others and is planning a stint of community aid work.

Founder & Director Nicole Graham is a beyondblue Speaker

Nicole Graham beyondblue Speaker

Founder & Director of Emergency ID Australia Nicole Graham is also proud to support beyondblue as a member of the Ambassador and Speaker bureau, sharing her story to increase awareness and understanding of anxiety and depression in Australia and to reduce the associated stigma.

Our vision is an Australian community that understands anxiety and depression, empowers people to seek help, and supports recovery, management and resilience.

beyondblue is an independent, not-for-profit organisation and works across a range of settings and brings together expertise in order to provide information and programs to support those affected by anxiety and depression, and improve the mental health of every person in Australia.

Learn more about anxiety and depression, or talk it through with our support service.
www.beyondblue.org.au
1300 22 4636
Email or chat online at http://www.beyondblue.org.au/get-support/get-immediate-support

HeartKids Magazine - New Emergency ID Medical Info App Launched

HeartKids Emergency ID app

The world's best APP for you and your family!

Carry your phone - carry your Emergency ID. The world's best APP for you and your family!

It can be difficult to remember detailed and accurate information when ill or distressed. Store all you medical and emergency information and carry it with you!

Your most urgent information and identifying photo can be stored as the WALLPAPER of your locked screen, so it can be viewed in an Emergency without you unlocking the phone.

All other important information is stored in your APP, such as:
* Current Medical Conditions
* Medications
* Medical History
* Doctor's Name & Contact Details
* Specialist's Name & Contact Details
* Where Hospital Records are Kept
* Medical Insurance Details
and importantly, who you would like called in an Emergency and their contact details.

New Emergency ID Medical Info App provides peace of mind

Emergency ID APP

A NEW medical App developed in the Hastings by leading medical jewellery provider, Emergency ID Australia, has the ability to transform mobile phones into potentially life-saving devises.

A new medical ‘App’ developed in the Hastings by leading medical jewellery provide, Emergency ID Australia, has the ability to transform mobile phones into potentially life-saving devises.

The Emergency ID Medical Info App, launched recently on the Apple App Store, enables users to display their urgent medical information, such as allergies and emergency contact details, on the phone’s locked screen.

The App also provides a simple way to store, save and share additional important medical details, such as medication dosages and history of procedures.

Director of Emergency ID Australia Nicole Graham designed the App to provide users with peace of mind by giving Emergency Services access to critical information when it matters most.

“When I was working in the Emergency Services, we looked at people’s phones to gain information but they were often locked or password protected,” Mrs Graham said.

“In an emergency situation the ability to find important details quickly can mean the difference between life and death.

“As someone who has undergone major surgery and had numerous doctors, procedures and medications to keep track of, I understand how difficult it can be to recall everything, particularly when you are ill, injured, or shocked – and obviously impossible if you were unconscious.

“This new App allows you to store medical information for your own records, and to share them with your doctors and health care professionals.”

The App enables users to input current medical conditions, allergies and reactions, medical history, doctor's details, where records are kept, medical insurance, current medications and dosages, and emergency contact details.

The team are now working on developing an Android App.

Potentially lifesaving idea

It’s important that everyone including family, friends, teachers, childcare staff and work colleagues knows where their medical kit is and what they need to do in case of emergency”

MEDIA RELEASE FEBRUARY 2013

Medical pouches provide a safer return to school or work

For thousands of children with severe food allergies, diabetes and epilepsy, the back-to-school essentials aren’t limited to new notebooks and lunchboxes but also life-saving medical pouches packed with vital medications, adrenalin pens and emergency action plans.

In response to requests received via social media, Emergency ID Australia has released a set of easily identifiable medical pouches that list a person’s critical allergies or illness information and carry all their vital medical items for quick access in an emergency.

Founder and Director of Emergency ID Australia Nicole Graham said with one in ten people suffering from food allergies , 1.7 million people living with diabetes and 230,000 with epilepsy , there may be someone in every school or workplace that suffers from anaphylaxis, seizures or other life-threatening illness.

“It’s important that everyone including family, friends, teachers, childcare staff and work colleagues knows where their medical kit is and what they need to do in case of emergency,” Mrs Graham said.

“This is important for children starting at a new school or going into a class with a new teacher, especially where various medications belonging to numerous children are stored together and must be matched to the right child quickly without confusion.”

Mrs Graham understands personally the need for people to keep their information and medication in one pouch after a young lady with epilepsy suffered a seizure while visiting her house recently.

“She managed to signal to her backpack, which her partner then emptied out all over the floor and sifted through everything to try and find what she needed,” Mrs Graham said. “It occurred to me that if she had an easily recognisable and accessible medical kit then it would have been much easier and quicker for us to provide the assistance she needed.”

Mrs Graham said the social media community had played a large part in designing the pouches.

“We asked people exactly what they needed and incorporated their ideas into the design including bright colours, clear labelling, carabiner for clipping to bags, heat and water resistance, and space for medical information and a photo card,” Mrs Graham said.

“The response has been overwhelming, with parents in particular saying the pouches have given them greater peace of mind that their child will be safer when they send them off to school.”

Radio Interviews

Emergency ID Australia medical jewellery awareness radio interviews

Available for radio interviews

We have conducted interviews with (in no particular order):

* ABC Radio Canberra - Genevieve Jacobs
* ABC Radio Gippsland - Brett Glover
* ABC Radio Mid North Coast - Cameron Marshall
* ABC Radio Central Coast - Scott Levi
* Voice FM - Robert Bath & Ron Woods
* Star FM - Leanne Stamps
* 2BC Radio Bathurst - Lucy Brennan
* Star FM 102.3 Mid North Coast - Digs & Nic
* Macquarie Regional Radio - Jennie-Mae Smyth
* 4LM Mount Isa & surrounds (North West)
* 4HI Central Highlands & Gemfields
* 4ZR Maranoa & Western Downs
* 4VL The Warrego & Greater South West
* 4SB South Burnett & Northern Downs
* Hot Country - South West The Central West, Goondiwindi & Dalby.
* 2WayFM - Peter Saville
* 96.5 Brisbane - Pete Hall
* 100.5FM 2HC Coffs Coast - Simon Hodges
* 101.7 WSFM
* 2BC Bathurst Radio - Andrew Gee
* 99.9 Ballarat - Roberth Bath

If you would like Nicole Graham Founder & Director of Emergency ID Australia to appear on your program please contact director@emergencyID.com.au or Michelle Newman of Newman Communications michelle@newmancommunications.com.au

Various Print Articles about Emergency ID Australia (not advertisements)

Emergency ID Australia makes news

Emergency ID Australia is in the media in all around Australia

Port Macquarie Independent - 15 August 2013
"Stay cool in a crisis"

Wauchope Gazette - 15 August 2013
"Health services on display"

Highlands Post (Bowral) - 15 August 2013
"Be aware of Emergency ID"

Cairns Sun - 14 August 2013
"Identification Vital"

Harvey-Waroona Reporter - 13 August 2013
"Accident Checklist"

Lightening Ridge News (Newspaper) - 8 August 2013
"Simple steps to saving a life anywhere, anytime."

Sunraysia Daily (Newspaper) - 8 August 2013
"Accident advice for services"

Heart Kids Victoria Tasmania (Magazine) Winter 2013

Crookwell Gazette (Newspaper) - 25 July 2013
"New emergency ID app turns phones into lifesavers"

Focus Magazine (Magazine) - October 2011
"Women in Business"

Ambulance Active (Magazine) Spring 2011
"Emergency ID Australia"

National Safety Council of Australia (Magazine) - February 2011
"Emergency ID"

NSW Govt Trade & Investment - 2010
"Emergency ID Australia"

Alzheimer's Australia WA Ltd (Information Sheet) - 2010
"Emergency ID Australia"

Bicycle Victoria Ride On (Product Review) - August 2010
"Emergency ID Sport ID Helmet"

Emergency Services Report (Magazine) - October 2010
"Advances in Medical Jewellery & Emergency ID"

Gladstone Observer QLD

Augusta Margaret River Mail WA

Namoi Valley Independent NSW

Southern Argus SA

Tatura Guardian VIC

Bega District News NSW

Wauchope Gazette NSW

Port News NSW

4KQ QLD

WSFM NSW

Westpac Rescue Helicopter Services Supports the Emergency ID SPOT program

Emergency ID Spot with Westpac Rescue Helicopter

“Armed with immediate information about a patient’s allergies, medications and conditions, emergency services can provide the very best medical care on the spot. We wish everyone had the Emergency ID Spot in their vehicles and in their homes. This simple sticker will certainly help save lives.”

“Armed with immediate information about a patient’s allergies, medications and conditions, emergency services can provide the very best medical care on the spot. We wish everyone had the Emergency ID Spot in their vehicles and in their homes. This simple sticker will certainly help save lives,” Mr Jones said.

Ambulance Active - Official Journal National Council of Ambulance Unions Australia

Ambulance Active - Official journal of the National Council of Ambulance Unions

Medical jewellery has advanced greatly in recent years - are you aware of its benefits and advancements?

"Medical jewellery has advanced greatly in recent years - are you aware of its benefits and advancements?

People wear Medical Jewellery because they NEED and WANT to tell you something! Checking for Emergency ID takes just a few seconds, yet could make all the difference in giving you vital information that needs to be passed on, and it's simple:

1. Check patient for Medical Jewellery or Emergency ID.
2. Turn the item over and read the most urgent information engraved.
3. When appropriate you or hospital staff can call the 24hr 1300 number on the rear & quote the individuals member number.
4. After verification you will receive information that the patient WANTS or NEEDS you to know eg their medical history, medications, allergies, who they would like contacted and more.

Emergency ID Australia are the leaders in medical jewellery with the largest range in Australia. Thousands Australia wide have great peace of mind for themselves and those who care about them from wearing Emergency ID. Would you recognise these items? Take a few minutes to make yourself familiar with these items and their training page..."

Business Owner of The Year Award

Business Owner of The Year Award 2012

Emergency ID Australia's Nicole Graham took out the prestigious HBWN Business Owner of the Year Award 2012

"The business has the largest range of medical jewellery and Emergency ID products in Australia and is the leader in the field.

The judges were impressed by Nicole's tenacity and her overall approach and commitment to her business."

National Safety Council of Australia

Lifesaving emergency information is now available on the spot.

Lifesaving emergency information is now available on the spot.

A new patient information program designed to improve emergency care for people involved in car crashes or suffering serious illness at home has been released in Australia, following the success of similar programs in the US that have been credited with saving thousands of lives.

Emergency Services Report - Australia

Emergency Services Report magazine feature article on Emergency ID.

Emergency ID Australia now carries a huge range of the most useful and up-to-date emergency identification products available.

This interested 4 page feature article in the Emergency Services Report magazine on "Advances in Medical Jewellery & Emergency ID" features Emergency ID Australia as the leaders in Medical Jewellery and Emergency ID.

It also features the advancements in medical jewellery over time and the interesting story of Nicole Graham Founder/Director of Emergency ID Australia, and how through her experiences, in both the NSW Police and as a patient, Emergency ID Australia began.

The Emergency Services Report is distributed free throughout Australia to Police, Fire, Ambulance, Paramedics, SES, CFA, Surf Lifesaving and other individuals and organisations.

This article was not paid for in any way by Emergency ID Australia.

National Safety - The magazine of the National Safety Council of Australia

National Safety Council of Australia Magazine

We often work side by side with our employees and colleagues but do we know their vital medical details and other emergency information?

Emergency ID was featured on page 46 of the Products and Services Health and Wellbeing section of this reputable national magazine. This was an unpaid feature on Hard Hat ID and its use and benefits.

The National Safety Council of Australia is committed to helping clients and members continuously improve their workplace health, safety and environment.

"We often work side by side with our employees and colleagues but do we know their vital medical details and other emergency information? What if there was to be a workplace accident or they were to become suddenly ill or unconscious?

Do you have workers who go to other worksites where few people know detailed information about them? Would your workers HR records be up to date and immediately accessible if ther was an accident or an emergency?

If emergency or medical personnel attended your worksite, would they be able to access important information about the patient immediately?

Have your employees told you about their personal medical history and past illnesses? Are their next of kin details up to date?

Too many questions and one simple solution: Hard Hat ID - simple, immediate and accurate, up-to-date information."

This article was not paid for in any way by Emergency ID Australia.

NSW Government Trade & Investment Small Business NSW

NSW Govt Trade & Investment Small Business NSW

There are now thousands of Australians wearing or carrying Emergency ID and it is all distributed from Wauchope. (NSW Aust)

The story of Emergency ID Australia and it's founder Nicole Graham features in this NSW Govt website in their Starting Up Success Stories section.

"Prior to founding Emergency ID Australia Nicole Graham was a NSW Police Office dealing with the day to day traumas, accidents, missing people, victims of crime and everything and anything she came upon in her daily dealings of police duties.

Nicole experienced many serious incidents where personal ID information would have been beneficial to both the wearer and to emergency services personnel."

This article was not paid for in any way by Emergency ID Australia.

The Senior. Surviving with style. Health Report 2011

WHAT'S WRONG? - Wearing medical ID jewellery could be a life-saver if you have an accident or are suddenly taken ill.

"A STYLISH bracelet or necklace could save your life.

Medical jewellery, containing vital information about your health history, could be just what a passer-by or emergency service worker needs to ensure you receive the correct treatment in the event of an accident or sudden collapse.

Emergency ID Australia founder, Nicole Graham is a former police officer who experienced at first hand many serious incidents where personal ID information would have been beneficial."

"The jewellery is engraved iwth the name of the medical condition and a number which links to a 24 hour emerency contact centre form where more detailed information can be relayed."

This article was not paid for in any way by Emergency ID Australia.

ASEM Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine

ASEM Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine

“The Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine (ASEM) considers Emergency ID Spots a great initiative for both patients, Emergency Service providers and Emergency Departments. Having access at first contact to important information that may not otherwise be supplied, can be life saving”

Emergency ID is an Australian owned and operated provider of medical jewellery and emergency ID products.
The business was founded by former Police Officer, Nicole Graham, who had seen firsthand the need for vital patient information to be immediately accessible in emergency situations.
At just 34 Nicole experienced a serious heart condition which required open heart surgery and sparked her search for affordable, attractive and potentially lifesaving medical jewellery. After recognising the options were very limited, Nicole established Emergency ID Australia to provide greater product choice, and ultimately peace of mind, for Australians and their families.
People who benefit from medical jewellery and emergency ID include those with an existing medical condition, diabetes, epilepsy, allergies, dementia, children with special needs, those at risk of heart attack or stroke, athletes, those with mental illness or disabilities, and travellers.
Emergency ID has Australia’s largest range of medical ID bracelets, necklaces, key rings, lanyards, wallet cards, stickers and wrist bands. The business has launched an Emergency ID App for Apple and Android smartphones, which displays critical medical and contact details on a phone’s locked screen.
The business has a fast growing fan base with more than 33,000 likers on Facebook, testament to the popularity of its products for people of all ages with a wide range of health and medical needs.
Emergency ID Australia is Ausbuy accredited and Nicole Graham is a Board Member of Ausbuy.

www.emergencyid.com.au

August is Medical Jewellery Awareness Month

Medical Jewellery has undergone major advancements over recent years.

Medical Jewellery has undergone major advancements over recent years, with thousands of Australians now wearing items that feature unique identification numbers providing access to on-the-spot health records and personal details via a 24 hour phone service.

Medical Jewellery Awareness Month involves a national training initiative for healthcare and emergency personnel, and a call-out to members of the public to check for medical jewellery in all first aid and emergency situations.

Australian Healthcare & Hospitals Association (ahha) Supports Emergency ID Awareness Month

I’m urging everyone to spread the word during Emergency ID Awareness Month – if you know a doctor, nurse or paramedic please ask them to keep a look out for medical jewellery or other forms of emergency ID on patients and you may help save a life.

“Check Wrist, Neck, Wallet, Phone” – that’s the simple message for anyone involved in an accident, emergency or first aid situation being promoted during Emergency ID Awareness Month this August.

Hundreds of thousands of people with serious medical conditions such as severe allergies, heart disease and dementia wear medical jewellery, carry emergency ID cards and keep vital healthcare information on their smartphones which could potentially save their lives – the key is to ensure people remember to look for it.

Nicole Graham, Director and Founder of Emergency ID Australia, said Emergency ID Awareness Month aims to educate everyone, especially paramedics, first aiders, nurses and doctors to check the wrist, neck, wallet and phone of the person they are caring for.

“As part of Emergency ID Awareness Month, we’ve embarked on a national training initiative to encourage medical personnel to take a few seconds to check if their patients have critical details on them that could greatly improve their ability to provide care,” Mrs Graham said.

“Emergency ID products have undergone major advancements over recent years, with necklaces and bracelets featuring unique identification numbers providing access to on-the-spot health records and personal details via a 24 hour phone service.

“People are also using their phones as potentially lifesaving devices, with applications like the recently launched Emergency ID App allowing them to display their urgent medical information such as medications, allergies and next-of-kin contact details on the phone’s locked screen.”

Tamara Donoghue, who suffered an epileptic seizure on a flight from the United States, said she was lucky she was wearing her Emergency ID and that it was discovered in time.

“I had just got up to move around the cabin and the next thing I knew the flight crew were giving me first aid,” Ms Donoghue said. “They weren’t sure what was wrong with me, but one of them noticed my Emergency ID bracelet which was engraved with my details. They put me on oxygen and had an Ambulance meet the plane at the airport to provide further treatment.

“Wearing my Emergency ID makes me feel safe and gives me peace of mind because it can speak for me when I’m not able to do so and helps people provide me with the care and treatment I need.

“I’m urging everyone to spread the word during Emergency ID Awareness Month – if you know a doctor, nurse or paramedic please ask them to keep a look out for medical jewellery or other forms of emergency ID on patients and you may help save a life.”

Bringing country Tasmania beyond blue

Bringing country Tasmania beyondblue Nicole Graham

Mrs Graham, a former street cop, said country towns could be feel isolating, but you could always speak to your GP or go to the beyondblue website. “It’s good to see mental health brought to the forefront in Deloraine.”

Two groups in Deloraine have banded together to show country Tasmanians its ok to talk about mental health.

Deloraine Kangaroos Football Club and Deloraine Rotary Club will host a beyondblue day on July 15 to raise awareness and improve the lives of people affected by anxiety and depression.

Beyondblue speaker Nicole Graham and Make.Runs.Maxi public speaker Rulla Kelly-Mansell will both speak at the event.

Mr Kelly-Mansell, who is also a state league footballer, said his goal was to try and help people live a happy and healthy life, by discussing solutions to problems faced with mental health.

“I focus on the positives and steer away from the negatives.”

It would be an emotional day for many of the players and Mr Kelly-Mansell as it would honour Isaac “Maxi” Walters, who died earlier this year.

His brother Joseph Walters said if you feel down, speak up. “It’s ok to talk to people.”

Mrs Graham, a former street cop, said country towns could be feel isolating, but you could always speak to your GP or go to the beyondblue website.

“It’s good to see mental health brought to the forefront in Deloraine.”

Deloraine Kangaroos Football Club president Shaun Donohue said he hoped the event would encourage people to talk to their mates about their mental health.

“Suicide is the leading cause of death for Australians aged between 15 and 44, with around 3,000 people dying by suicide every year,” Mr Donohue said.

“You might have some tough times … but there is a light at the end of the tunnel.”

Tickets are $20 per person for a two course meal, RSVP to the Deloraine Kangaroos Football Club committee by July 8.

If you or someone you know needs help, contact beyondblue on 1300 22 4636 or chat online at the beyondblue.org.au website.

Campbell Town Show Guest Speaker Nicole Graham from beyondblue

CAMPBELL TOWN SHOW GUEST SPEAKER NICOLE GRAHAM - BEYOND BLUE

Nicole became a beyondblue speaker to share her experience to make people aware that mental health conditions don't discriminate and can be talked about, treated and managed. She wants to show that you can excel to even higher heights and fulfilment after having a mental illness.

Nicole Graham was a street cop for 13 years, working in both busy Sydney suburbs and isolated small country towns. She is a multi-award winning business woman and entrepreneur. She is on several boards and advisory groups with beyondblue, NSW Police Force, Heritage Highway Tourism and was the President of the Australian Companies Institute (AUSBUY).

Nicole moved with her family to Tasmania in late 2014 where they purchased a heritage sandstone Church, which is being renovated into a café, functions & wedding venue, due to open in October.

Nicole is a volunteer speaker for beyondblue, a national organisation that works to raise awareness about mental health, reduce the associated stigma and encourage people to get help.

Nicole became a beyondblue speaker to share her experience to make people aware that mental health conditions don't discriminate and can be talked about, treated and managed. She wants to show that you can excel to even higher heights and fulfilment after having a mental illness.

Nicole is married with 3 children; a 23yr old professional skydiver, a 21yr old law student and a 7 year old who wants to be an “army man”, V8 driver, farmer, musician....and that was just this week.

Her interests include travelling, swimming, reading and taking on new challenges to live life to the fullest.

Emergency ID APP Launch!

Emergency ID App

The Emergency ID app displays urgent medical information, such as allergies and emergency contact details, on the iPhone’s locked screen for easy access by paramedics, emergency services personnel and healthcare professionals.

iPHONES: https://itunes.apple.com/au/app/emergency-id/id594157421?mt=8

GOOGLE PLAY: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.emergencyidaustralia.e...

The Emergency ID app displays urgent medical information, such as allergies and emergency contact details, on the iPhone’s locked screen for easy access by paramedics, emergency services personnel and healthcare professionals.

The app has been designed to suit those with severe allergies to foods or medicines, existing medical conditions such as epilepsy or heart disease, and those with dementia, for example.

Users can input current medical conditions, allergies and reactions, history of procedures, doctors’ details, where records are kept, insurance, medications and dosages, and emergency contact details.

The app was developed by Nicole Graham, whose experience in the police force and with her own medical issues highlighted a need that had yet to be addressed.

“When I was working in the Emergency Services, we looked at people’s phones to try to find their details, but they were often locked or password protected so any potentially useful information was inaccessible,” she explains. “Having your In Case of Emergency (ICE) details stored in your phone’s contacts is a good start, but if your phone is password protected and you are unconscious then it’s not much help. We designed this app as a way of getting around that problem".

“I understand how difficult it can be to recall everything, particularly when you are ill, injured, shocked or flustered – and obviously impossible if you are unconscious,” she continues. “The app allows you to store and save more detailed medical information inside it for your own records, and to share them with your doctors and healthcare professionals.”

The potentially life-saving app is available for both iOS and Android.

Emergency ID Australia's Medical Jewellery Awareness Month

Medical Jewellery Awareness Month is conducted nationally throughout Australia to Raise awareness that thousands of people Australia wide wear or carry Emergency ID & Medical Jewellery because they need or want to tell Medical and Emergency Personnel something important about themselves.

Medical Jewellery Awareness Month is conducted nationally throughout Australia to Raise awareness that thousands of people Australia wide wear or carry Emergency ID & Medical Jewellery because they need or want to tell Medical and Emergency Personnel something important about themselves.

Be aware - show you care! With all First Aid - Check for Emergency ID. It may hold the key for what is wrong & what the patient needs you to know.

Perhaps the person wearing or carrying Emergency ID Medical Jewellery needs to advise:
- Who they are
- Who they want contacted
- That they have a pre existing medical condition
- A medical history that can effect current or future treatments
- An allergy and the reaction they have
- That they are taking certain medications that could affect their treatment or react with other drugs
- Are unable to communicate effectively or with full accuracy
- Have special needs that need to be taken into consideration
- Can easily become confused
- Have certain family, carers, loved ones or friends that need to be informed so they are not left alone or for any reason.

Emergency ID Australia can pass this information onto Medical and Emergency personnel 24hrs a day - every day! Linking you and your medical information to Emergency ID Australia's secure data base. Giving you and your family peace of mind that information needed will be relayed when needed the most.
Telephone: 1300 369 142

Emergency ID Awareness Month - August

Emergency ID Awareness Month

CHECK: Wrist, Neck, Wallet, Phone. It could be a LIFESAVER!

MEDIA RELEASE – AUGUST 2013

August is Emergency ID Awareness Month
Check Wrist, Neck, Wallet, Phone

“Check Wrist, Neck, Wallet, Phone” – that’s the simple message for anyone involved in an accident, emergency or first aid situation being promoted during Emergency ID Awareness Month this August.

Hundreds of thousands of people with serious medical conditions such as severe allergies, heart disease and dementia wear medical jewellery, carry emergency ID cards and keep vital healthcare information on their smartphones which could potentially save their lives – the key is to ensure people remember to look for it.

Nicole Graham, Director and Founder of Emergency ID Australia, said Emergency ID Awareness Month aims to educate everyone, especially paramedics, first aiders, nurses and doctors to check the wrist, neck, wallet and phone of the person they are caring for.

“As part of Emergency ID Awareness Month, we’ve embarked on a national training initiative to encourage medical personnel to take a few seconds to check if their patients have critical details on them that could greatly improve their ability to provide care,” Mrs Graham said.

“Emergency ID products have undergone major advancements over recent years, with necklaces and bracelets featuring unique identification numbers providing access to on-the-spot health records and personal details via a 24 hour phone service.
“People are also using their phones as potentially lifesaving devices, with applications like the recently launched Emergency ID App allowing them to display their urgent medical information such as medications, allergies and next-of-kin contact details on the phone’s locked screen.”

Tamara Donoghue, who suffered an epileptic seizure on a flight from the United States, said she was lucky she was wearing her Emergency ID and that it was discovered in time.

“I had just got up to move around the cabin and the next thing I knew the flight crew were giving me first aid,” Ms Donoghue said. “They weren’t sure what was wrong with me, but one of them noticed my Emergency ID bracelet which was engraved with my details. They put me on oxygen and had an Ambulance meet the plane at the airport to provide further treatment.

“Wearing my Emergency ID makes me feel safe and gives me peace of mind because it can speak for me when I’m not able to do so and helps people provide me with the care and treatment I need.
“I’m urging everyone to spread the word during Emergency ID Awareness Month – if you know a doctor, nurse or paramedic please ask them to keep a look out for medical jewellery or other forms of emergency ID on patients and you may help save a life.”

Emergency ID SPOT - Changing the way YOU provide information to Emergency Services

Emergency ID SPOT

LIFESAVING emergency information is now available on the spot after the launch of a new program.

Lifesaving emergency information now available on the SPOT!

A new patient information program designed to improve emergency care for people involved in car crashes or suffering serious illness at home has been released in Australia, following the success of similar programs in the United States which have been credited with saving thousands of lives.

Emergency ID Spots, which are endorsed by the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service, are placed on a vehicle’s rear window or the front door of a house to alert police, paramedics and other first responders that a patient’s critical health information can be found inside, either in the glove box, on the sun visor or on the fridge.

The information, such as allergies, prescription medications, previous surgeries, pre-existing conditions and other vital information can ensure the best emergency treatment is administered during the ‘golden hour’ – the first 60 minutes or so after a serious accident or acute health event which can often mean the difference between life and death.

By including a photograph, emergency services personnel can check who the information relates to, while the inclusion of a list of emergency contact and next of kin details mean your loved ones can be informed immediately.

Founder and director of Emergency ID Australia, Nicole Graham, said as a former police officer she had come across countless people who were unconscious, disoriented or in so much pain they were not able to pass on critical information to carers.

“Three million drivers reported being in a car accident in the last five years in Australia* – and even in less serious crashes people often go into shock, which means they find it hard to remember important details or communicate clearly,” Ms Graham said.

“If you or your loved ones have a serious allergy to medications, a heart condition, diabetes or epilepsy for example, you can rely on the Emergency ID Spot to tell emergency services that vital information, even if you can’t.”

The Emergency ID Spots have received the backing of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service. General Manager Richard Jones said his organisation had thrown its support behind this initiative.

“Armed with immediate information about a patient’s allergies, medications and conditions, emergency services can provide the very best medical care on the spot. We wish everyone had the Emergency ID Spot in their vehicles and in their homes. This simple sticker will certainly help save lives,” Mr Jones said.

Ms Graham said she expected the Emergency ID Spots would be particularly popular with seniors, travellers and grey nomads.

“As people get older they are more likely to have multiple medical conditions, take medication routinely, and be more vulnerable to critical injury in an accident, or likely to suffer a serious medical problem at home,” Ms Graham said.

“The Spots are also expected to prove valuable for transport and trucking companies and other professional drivers. They also provide peace of mind for families who need to know their children will receive proper care if the parents are unable to pass on life saving information.”
Emergency ID Australia will donate 10% of sales of the Spots to the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

A YouTube video showing the benefits of the program has been released: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RdD78o29DOk

Emergency ID stickers a must

Emergency ID stickers a must

Vital information: Emergency ID was founded by former Police Officer, Nicole Graham, who had seen firsthand the need for vital patient information to be immediately accessible in emergency situations. The stickers are designed to be displayed on child seats, inside car doors and glove-boxes.

AS thousands of families hit the road during the peak holiday period, an Australian company has developed a simple yet effective way to provide Emergency Services personnel with critical patient information at the scene of serious accidents.

See your ad here

See your ad here
Emergency ID Australia has released a range of vehicle stickers for child seats, glove-boxes and inside car doors designed to alert paramedics and police to potentially life-saving information about a vehicle's occupants such as illnesses, medications, allergies and next of kin details.

Founder and Director of Emergency ID Australia Nicole Graham said despite the reduction in the national holiday road toll this was not a time to be complacent, with road crashes responsible for approximately 1,400 deaths and 32,500 serious injuries each yeari.

"According to the National Road Safety Strategy 2011-2020, an average of 4 people are killed and 90 are seriously injured on Australian roads every dayii, so it's important that we make it easier for the Emergency Services to better care for us when we need it most," Mrs Graham said.

"All it takes is to fill out important medical information about you and your loved ones and place the sticker somewhere prominent - whether you are having a family holiday, commuting to work, or if driving is your occupation.

"In the event of an accident the people involved may be seriously injured or in shock and unable to pass on critical details about themselves or others to Emergency Services personnel."

The Emergency ID Vehicle Stickers come in three sizes to suit individuals, small or large families and can be used in cars, trucks and caravans.

"For truck drivers who may have pre-existing health issues, for caravanning couples who require certain medications, or for families who have children with anaphylaxis or allergic reactions these simple stickers could be a life saver," Mrs Graham said.

"These products are designed to act as a backup to wearing Emergency ID medical jewellery, which can be engraved with vital health details and provide access to important medical information via a 24 hour call service."

Emergency ID has Australia's largest range of medical ID bracelets, necklaces, key rings, lanyards, wallet cards, stickers and wrist bands. The business has launched an Emergency ID App for Apple and Android smartphones, which displays critical medical and contact details on a phone's locked screen. Emergency ID Australia is Ausbuy accredited and Nicole Graham is a Board Member of Ausbuy.

For more information visit: www.emergencyid.com.au

Emergency Services Report magazine Medical & Emergency Service Training

People often incorrectly think that their driver's licence holds enough information about them.

6 easy steps for training of Medical & Emergency Services:

1. Check the patient for Medical Jewellery or Emergency ID.
2. Turn the item over and read the back.
3. Call the 24hr 1300 number on the rear and quote the unique number. Most will also have a medical condition engraved for your immediate reference.
4. Emergency line staff will ask your name and location. They will then immediately call you back to verify you are medical/emergency personnel.
5. You will then be given all the wearers vital information that they WANT or NEED passed on to you.
6. You can now treat/assist the patient knowing more details about them, they medical conditions/history, medications, allergies and who they would like contacted.

This article was not paid for in any way by Emergency ID Australia.

From PTSD to entrepreneur

Over 0 sixty media article on Nicole Graham Emergency ID Australia

Was this surgery one of the reasons you started your business? “One of the outcomes of my heart issue was that I was recommended to wear medical jewellery so that if anything happened to me in the future, medical or emergency personnel would have some knowledge of my history. That’s when I found there were very limited choices available and it was generally very unattractive – I guess as a 30-something young woman I didn’t fit their target market! It got me thinking and I realised that members of my own family would have benefited from medical jewellery too.

With an award-winning business under her belt, Over60 sat down with mum-of-three and ex-Police officer, Nicole Graham, to talk about how suffering PTSD and mitral valve prolapse led her to start Emergency ID to help others like her.

You used to work in the Police force, why did you decide to leave?
“I joined the Police force in 1989 at the age of 20. I had a strong sense of social justice and enjoyed the mateship within the force. We literally put our lives in each other’s hands and faced the most harrowing experiences side by side.

I was a ‘career cop’ and my ultimate aim was to become the first female commissioner. However, that all went pear-shaped when, like so many other Police, I was struck down with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after 13 years.

During my time stationed in busy western Sydney and remote rural communities, I experienced many horrific situations – fatalities, sieges, autopsies, stabbings, suicides, accidents and domestic violence – and I specialised in taking statements from sexually and physically abused children.

It eventually took its toll and I was severely affected by flashbacks, depression and anxiety. Most people don’t realise the huge amount of stress Police deal with and they have an extremely high rate of PTSD, depression, divorce and suicide. We need to look after and appreciate our Police a lot better than we do.”

You’ve had major heart surgery, can you tell us about this?
“I was 34-years-old and the mother of two young children. I was into fitness and competing in biathlons. During a routine GP visit I mentioned that I had been experiencing dizziness, vomiting and tiredness but had been pushing through to maintain my fitness.

[The doctor] listened to my heart and sent me immediately to a cardiologist. Within a week I was in St Vincent’s Hospital having open heart surgery. I was diagnosed with mitral valve prolapse, which meant oxygenated blood was not pumping around my body as it should, and told I was extremely lucky that I didn’t have a massive heart attack.

It was a long and slow recovery after a few complications, life support, intensive care and rehabilitation.

Living through such a traumatic time made me realise what is important in life. In the long run it changed me for the better. They say what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger – and that was certainly the case for me.”

Was this surgery one of the reasons you started your business?
“One of the outcomes of my heart issue was that I was recommended to wear medical jewellery so that if anything happened to me in the future, medical or emergency personnel would have some knowledge of my history.

That’s when I found there were very limited choices available and it was generally very unattractive – I guess as a 30-something young woman I didn’t fit their target market!

It got me thinking and I realised that members of my own family would have benefited from medical jewellery too.

I had an uncle with an intellectual disability who was killed by a drunk driver. He had spent hours in the hospital and then the morgue before we even knew anything had happened because he had no ID on him.

My father suffered from cancer when he was 26 until his passing at 43. He had great difficulty remembering his lengthy medical history, medications and contact details of specialists. Medical staff really needed to know those details so he could be treated correctly but he didn’t wear or carry anything as there was nothing suitable.

I also knew from my time in the Police, that it is so difficult to contact people in times of emergencies. Often the only details we had of those seriously injured, or worse, was an address from their licence. We were so often unable to contact loved ones and many heartbreaking moments could have been avoided if people carried emergency information on them.”

What is Emergency ID all about?
“Emergency ID is all about having a huge variety of products and services to relay vital information to first aiders, emergency services and hospital personnel if you are involved in an accident or medical incident. It’s all about providing information that could save your life, rather than leaving those treating you guessing if you have any previous medical conditions, medications or history that can affect your treatment. It’s also about having emergency contacts on or with you at all times so that the correct people can be notified and with you when you need it the most.”

What are you most proud of in relation to your business?
“Nine years ago the business consisted of a laptop on my dining room table and five products. We now have the largest and most diverse range available and we are world leaders in our field. We have also been independently judged and awarded numerous times – we are the most awarded in our field. We’re proudly 100 per cent Australian and AUSBUY accredited.

I am also very proud that as we grow we are becoming more and more involved in giving to charities and organisations. For example, we have proudly supported the Love Your Sister campaign, we are in a fundraising partnership with The McGrath Foundation, and I recently did the St Vincent’s CEO Sleepout, where I slept out on the street to raise money for the homeless. We also proudly donate Emergency ID to those in dire financial need and who are homeless though the Matthew Talbot Hostel and St Vincent de Paul Health Clinic in Kings Cross, NSW.

Lastly I am very proud to have just become a volunteer speaker for Beyond Blue, working to reduce the impact of depression and anxiety in the community by raising awareness and understanding, empowering people to seek help, and supporting recovery, management and resilience.”

What’s next for you?
“Doing more community work. I have lots of speaking engagements including one for Beyond Blue and supporting more and more charities and community events. I’d also like to take Emergency ID Australia worldwide, so we can not only assist Australians, but anyone who could benefit from wearing or having Emergency ID in a crisis. Oh, and travelling and being with the loves of my life – my husband and my three children. My 20-year-old skydiving instructor son, my 18-year-old budding lawyer daughter and an overly loved, attention-seeking four-year-old. Yes, there is a huge age gap there.”

Lifesaving Emergency Information available on the spot!

Ram Training Services Emergency ID Australia

It’s expected the Emergency ID Spots will be particularly popular with seniors, travellers and grey nomads. This is due to people who are older are far more likely to have multiple medical conditions, take medication routinely, and be more vulnerable to critical injury in an accident, or likely to suffer a serious medical problem at home.

A new patient information program designed to improve emergency care for people involved in car crashes or suffering serious illness at home has been released in Australia, following the success of similar programs in the United States which have been credited with saving thousands of lives.

What is an ID Spot

Emergency ID Spots are placed on a vehicle’s rear window or the front door of a house to alert police, paramedics and other first responders that a patient’s critical health information can be found inside, either in the glove box, on the sun visor or on the fridge.

The information, such as allergies, prescription medications, previous surgeries, pre-existing conditions and other vital information can ensure the best emergency treatment is administered during the ‘golden hour’ which is the first 60 minutes. So after a serious accident or acute health event treatment can be more efficient and effective which can often mean the difference between life and death.

By including a photograph, emergency services personnel can check who the information relates to, while the inclusion of a list of emergency contact and next of kin details mean your loved ones can be informed immediately. Founder and director of Emergency ID Australia, Nicole Graham, stated that as a former police officer she had come across countless people who were unconscious, disoriented or in so much pain they were not able to pass on critical information to carers.

Check out the video below to see the ID Spots in action..

What Does the ID Spot Mean for the Average Person?

To put it in perspective a reported three million drivers were involved in a car accident in the past five years in Australia, and even in less serious crashes people often go into shock, which means they find it hard to remember important details or communicate clearly to emergency services personnel.

If you or a loved one has a serious allergy to medications, a heart condition, diabetes or epilepsy for example, you can rely on the Emergency ID Spot to tell emergency services that vital information, even if you can’t.

Industry Perspective

The Emergency ID Spots have received the backing of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service. General Manager Richard Jones who said his organisation had thrown its support behind this initi-ative.

The ability to be armed with immediate information about a patient’s allergies, medications and conditions, allows emergency services the opportunity to provide the very best medical care on the spot. With many in the medical field wishing everyone had the Emergency ID Spot in their vehicles and in their homes, as they’re sure the simple sticker will certainly help save lives.

It’s expected the Emergency ID Spots will be particularly popular with seniors, travellers and grey nomads. This is due to people who are older are far more likely to have multiple medical conditions, take medication routinely, and be more vulnerable to critical injury in an accident, or likely to suffer a serious medical problem at home.

The Spots are also expected to prove valuable for transport and trucking companies and other professional drivers. They also provide peace of mind for families who need to know their children will receive proper care if the parents are unable to pass on life saving information.
Emergency ID Australia have also stated they will donate 10% of sales from the ID Spots to the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

Overall this simple device could lead to progressively more efficient medical facilitation throughout the country, with supporters assuring that society will be able to SPOT the difference!

Medical Bling Is Becoming The In Thing

Emergency ID Australia in Blacktown Advocate for Medical Jewellery Awareness

We've embarked on a national training initiative to encourage medical personnel to take a few seconds to check if the patient has emergency ID that could improve their ability to provide care for that person.

IT'S Medical Jewellery Awareness Month, reminding the community to be aware of emergency ID in a crisis.

Medical Jewellery, engravings on jewellery which detail health records and personal medical details, helps emergency service workers assess a patient's allergies, reactions or special
conditions before treatment.

Director of Emergency ID Australia Nicole Graham said: "Medical jewellery is now attractive, comfortable and quite subtle, which is great news for the wearer, but also poses a challenge for emergency services, so education and awareness is the key.

"We've embarked on a national training initiative to encourage medical personnel to take a few seconds to check if the patient has emergency ID that could improve their ability to provide care for that person.

Healthcare workers and emergency services personnel are urged to check patients for the jewellery and utilise a 24-hour medical information phone service.

This information is important when treating patients as it advises of any illnesses or ailments which may impede certain courses of action.

There is a growing trend of medical jewellery among sufferers of dementia, autism and also the aged so medical histories are accessible and complex medical histories are accessible at any time.

Mental Health Awareness Theme for the Construction Materials Industry Safety Seminar

Mental Health Awareness Theme for the Construction Materials Industry Safety Sem

Attendees were spellbound by a presentation delivered by Nicole Graham from beyondblue about her battle with post-traumatic stress disorder, her recovery and what she had learnt.

The Tasmanian Committee held the 2016 Construction Materials Industry Safety Seminar in conjunction with WorkSafe Tasmania October Safety Month. Health and mental health themes contributed to an engaging program introduced by the Minister for Resources and Building and Construction the Hon. Guy Barnett MP.

Attendees were spellbound by a presentation delivered by Nicole Graham from beyondblue about her battle with post-traumatic stress disorder, her recovery and what she had learnt. Other presentations included a short introduction of the support provided by Rural Alive and Well from Andrew Baker and Stephen Duggan described new safety training courses offered by the Institute of Quarrying Australia.

The Chief Inspector of Mines, Fred Sears described to the group how the new mine safety legislation is being drafted and will be introduced over the coming year, emphasizing that the team from Work Safe Tasmania will be out talking through the changes with industry. Lauren Jago of Stornoway engaged delegates with a presentation on difficult business of cultural change within an organization. The day wound up with a demonstration on completing the agitator rollover prevention course by Terry Moore from Boral ably assisted by Brian Hauser who was MC for the day.

Online articles and Blogs about Emergency ID Australia

Emergency I D Australia bloggers and online articles

PHONE A LIFESAVER WITH EMERGENCY ID APP

Medical jewellery distributor Emergency ID Australia has released an app for Android and iOS that shows a user's critical medical details as wallpaper on the locked screen of their mobile phones.

The app allows users to display urgent information such as allergies and emergency contact details on the screen for easy access by paramedics, emergency services personnel and healthcare professionals.

Many people with health issues store their in case of emergency (ICE) details on their phones, but these are not much use when the phone is password protected and the user is unconscious.

Emergency ID Australia's founder and director, former police officer Nicole Graham, said her own health history had highlighted the need to share critical information.

Ms Graham set up the company to develop and distribute medical jewellery and accompanying products after suffering complications from a serious heart condition. The jewellery – including bracelets and pendants for adults and children – is aimed at those with an existing medical condition such as diabetes, epilepsy, allergies and dementia.

The app is also aimed at people with severe allergies to foods or medicines, existing medical conditions like epilepsy or heart disease and for those with dementia.

“As someone who has undergone major surgery and had numerous doctors, procedures and medications to keep track of, I understand how difficult it can be to recall everything, particularly when you are ill, injured, shocked or flustered – and obviously impossible if you are unconscious,” Ms Graham said.

“It allows you to store and save more detailed medical information inside the app for your own records, and to share them with your doctors and healthcare professionals.”

In addition to displaying an emergency contact or medical condition alert on the screen, users can input current medical conditions, allergies and reactions, history of procedures, doctor’s details, where records are kept, insurance, medications and dosages, and emergency contact details in the app.

Pulse IT: Australia's first and only eHealth & Health IT Magazine
http://www.pulseitmagazine.com.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=arti...

IT Wire: Today's latest IT news
http://www.itwire.com/your-it-news/mobility/60766-new-app-turns-phones-i...

Macworld
http://www.macworld.com.au/app-guide/emergency-id-102495/#.UeizJtLX9Qg

Australian Hospital & Healthcare Association
http://ahha.asn.au/news/new-emergency-id-app-turns-phones-lifesavers

Potentially lifesaving idea

It’s important that everyone including family, friends, teachers, childcare staff and work colleagues knows where their medical kit is and what they need to do in case of emergency”

MEDIA RELEASE FEBRUARY 2013

Medical pouches provide a safer return to school or work

For thousands of children with severe food allergies, diabetes and epilepsy, the back-to-school essentials aren’t limited to new notebooks and lunchboxes but also life-saving medical pouches packed with vital medications, adrenalin pens and emergency action plans.

In response to requests received via social media, Emergency ID Australia has released a set of easily identifiable medical pouches that list a person’s critical allergies or illness information and carry all their vital medical items for quick access in an emergency.

Founder and Director of Emergency ID Australia Nicole Graham said with one in ten people suffering from food allergies , 1.7 million people living with diabetes and 230,000 with epilepsy , there may be someone in every school or workplace that suffers from anaphylaxis, seizures or other life-threatening illness.

“It’s important that everyone including family, friends, teachers, childcare staff and work colleagues knows where their medical kit is and what they need to do in case of emergency,” Mrs Graham said.

“This is important for children starting at a new school or going into a class with a new teacher, especially where various medications belonging to numerous children are stored together and must be matched to the right child quickly without confusion.”

Mrs Graham understands personally the need for people to keep their information and medication in one pouch after a young lady with epilepsy suffered a seizure while visiting her house recently.

“She managed to signal to her backpack, which her partner then emptied out all over the floor and sifted through everything to try and find what she needed,” Mrs Graham said. “It occurred to me that if she had an easily recognisable and accessible medical kit then it would have been much easier and quicker for us to provide the assistance she needed.”

Mrs Graham said the social media community had played a large part in designing the pouches.

“We asked people exactly what they needed and incorporated their ideas into the design including bright colours, clear labelling, carabiner for clipping to bags, heat and water resistance, and space for medical information and a photo card,” Mrs Graham said.

“The response has been overwhelming, with parents in particular saying the pouches have given them greater peace of mind that their child will be safer when they send them off to school.”

Taking mental illness out of the shadows.

Taking mental illness out of the shadows Nicole Graham

"At the start of these evenings people are sitting at a table and no one is talking, but by the end of the night everyone is talking about it."

NICOLE Graham has had open heart surgery, been on life support and had cancer, but it was mental illness that was most life threatening.

The mum of three, who now calls Campbell Town home, will be the guest speaker at the beyondblue gala dinner this month.

Ms Graham, who has been a beyondblue speaker for 12 months, will share her story of mental illness and deliver a message of hope to those in attendance.

About 10 years ago Ms Graham's psychiatrist said the following: "Her outlook for the future is bleak and her need for ongoing psychiatric care is great ... I don't think she is likely to manage a return to work in a substantial way."

MESSAGE OF HOPE: Nicole Graham will speak about her struggle with mental illness at the beyondblue gala dinner this month.
MESSAGE OF HOPE: Nicole Graham will speak about her struggle with mental illness at the beyondblue gala dinner this month.
Today, Ms Graham is the founder and director of Emergency ID Australia - world leaders in medical jewellery and emergency ID - and is the president of the board of AUSBUY.

She recently moved to Tasmania and purchased an 1857 heritage listed church at Campbell Town which she and her husband are converting into a cafe.

Ms Graham has won numerous business awards including Business Woman of the Year.

About a decade ago she attempted suicide. It had culminated after leaving the police force diagnosed with post traumatic stress, chronic depression and anxiety.

"I was a mess, I was embarrassed, I was ashamed, " Ms Graham said.

"I was seeing psychologists and psychiatrists and having regular treatment. I even attended a clinic at a psych hospital one full day a week so I could learn to manage my illnesses.

"No one ever knew I was even attending these sessions, it was my secret, it was too shameful and the stigma and judgments were something I couldn't have coped with.

"I was bringing up two small children by myself, had lost my career, my identity, my husband, my home, some family and friends, my drive, my motivation and, most importantly, I had lost all hope.

"Losing hope was the most dangerous thing."

Ms Graham said her life wasn't as she planned. She intended to be the first female police commissioner for NSW. Today she is happily married with three children.

For 15 years she has been living with mental illness and was very sick for five years.

"It stole so much of my life and so many good times and memories," she said.

Ms Graham said evenings, like the gala dinner hosted by the Rotary Club of Ulverstone West and supported by beyondblue and Australian Rotary Health, allowed conversation on what had been a traditionally taboo subject.

"At the start of these evenings people are sitting at a table and no one is talking, but by the end of the night everyone is talking about it."

Ms Graham said that by sharing her story she could be saving the life of someone in the room or a loved one.

"We need to treat mental health issues as physical illnesses. People need to think about how they would help if their friend or family member had cancer or heart disease. Whatever you would do in that situation, you do with mental health issues."

Ms Graham will be the guest speaker at the beyondblue dinner on October 24 at Ulverstone. For more information contact Lindsay Morgan on 64252580.

If you or someone you know needs help contact beyondblue on 1300224636 or Lifeline on 131114.

Tasmanian beyondblue ambassador Nicole Graham shares her story.

Nicole Graham’s mental health deteriorated after continued exposure to horrific incidents during her 13 years with an interstate police force. Working in Sydney, moving to an isolated all-male country post then being re-stationed in the busy city also took its toll. “It was anything from murder and suicide to domestic violence to car accidents to farm accidents,” Mrs Graham said. “Child abuse and sexual abuse, that was a speciality of mine, and cot deaths too.”

AUSTRALIA’S “shocking” rates of mental illness have inspired a Campbell Town woman to share her own story of hope.

Nicole Graham’s mental health deteriorated after continued exposure to horrific incidents during her 13 years with an interstate police force.

Working in Sydney, moving to an isolated all-male country post then being re-stationed in the busy city also took its toll.

“It was anything from murder and suicide to domestic violence to car accidents to farm accidents,” Mrs Graham said.

“Child abuse and sexual abuse, that was a speciality of mine, and cot deaths too.”

Juggling motherhood, moving and a high-pressure environment resulted in behaviour that swung from teary to aggressive, self-isolating to social binge drinking.

Eventually, Mrs Graham’s ex-husband took her to see her GP.

Medication helped for some time but, in her words, the roller coaster was soon back in action.

Mrs Graham knew she had to leave the police force.

The next hurdle was finding employment.

“After a while I started my own business because I realised I had to create my own job,” Mrs Graham said.

“I didn’t have any help. It was a massive step but I knew I couldn’t turn up to another job, nine to five.”

Years later, Mrs Graham’s advice is to seek help, and seek help early.

Three million Australians live with anxiety and depression and Mrs Graham, now a beyondblue ambassador, hopes to show those people it is possible to come out on the other side.

“I’ve got to talk about it because it doesn’t affect me now but ... so many people relate to it,” she said.

“When you lose hope you can’t see the light at the end of the tunnel. I was flat out getting through the next hour, then the next day. Slowly that improved with lots of drugs and treatment.

“Although it does take a lot of effort and then there’s no instant cure, there is a lot of help for it.”

People seeking advice on mental health can visit beyondblue.org.au.

The Ex-Cop Who Made It Through PTSD

"Stress is common in daily life. Exposure to prolonged stress can start to affect your mental and physical health. Stress in our lives isn’t going to stop, so we need to find ways to manage it."

Nicole Graham was a cop who worked on child abuse and sexual assault cases. She was also the first female police officer in the small country town she was living in on the NSW-Victoria border.

Before this, she considered herself someone who could handle life's ups and downs like a "normal" person.

"They were very much a part my growing up, but I handled them and was still a very well balanced and positive person with a strong resilience," she explained to The Huffington Post Australia.

But something triggered in Graham later in life as she took on work, childcare and the devastating realities police work forced her to see.

"I loved my first six years in the police force, nothing unsettled me and I was always walking around with a smile on my face. It was where I thrived, she said.

"[Then] I started to feel the toll of the job and lack of support from some of the hierarchy.

"I felt very isolated, coupled with attending numerous traumatic events and mismanagement, going to work became horrible. The lack of support at work and nature of the job started to have a very negative effect on me."

Anxiety and depression are indiscriminate illnesses that will affect more than three million Aussies all together.

According to BeyondBlue depression in the workplace costs Australia $730 million a year, and more than one quarter of Australian workers experience stress or anxiety as a result of their working arrangements.

"Stressful work situations, particularly on-going stressful work situations, are risk factors for developing a mental health condition, such as depression," Nick Arvaniti, Head of Workplace Research and Resources at BeyondBlue, told HuffPost Australia.

"Many of the symptoms associated with having a mental health condition – disturbed sleep, feeling overwhelmed, lacking confidence, negative thinking patterns, poor concentration – if not managed well, will affect a person’s ability to fulfil the requirements of the job as well as their ability to manage situations outside the workplace."

Graham describes that time in her life as moments filled with exhaustion, sickness and constant crying.

"One minute I would be scared and shaky crossing the road, yet I would always be working by myself attending the most serious of jobs with no fear or regard to my own personal safety. I was becoming erratic."

Graham faced years of shame, of hiding her depression and her need for medication. Her marriage broke down and she faced open-heart surgery.

That tough exterior of Graham's led her to hide her pain for too long, culminating in an attempt on her own life.

Arvaniti said seeking support early is vital when coping with depression and ongoing stress at work.

"Early help-seeking is likely to lead to a quicker recovery and delayed help seeking can lead to a longer recovery time," he said.

Graham did eventually get that help. She began exercising. She saw psychologists and psychiatrists.

"I slowly got myself on track, it was a rollercoaster ride with many slumps.

"I met a new man and became more and more positive. I still had my ups and downs but they weren’t as erratic and now I had someone to support me and give me hope. He was positive and non-judgmental. He was my lifesaver."

Graham now speaks for BeyondBlue in an attempt to help reduce the stigma of depression and anxiety and to help others deal with their pain sooner than she did.

"Stress is common in daily life. Exposure to prolonged stress can start to affect your mental and physical health. Stress in our lives isn’t going to stop, so we need to find ways to manage it."

If you need help in a crisis, call Lifeline on 13 11 14. For further information about depression contact beyondBlue on 1300224636 or talk to your GP, local health professional or someone you trust.

To see more from Into The Middle Of Things, head here.

Women's business elite scoop awards

Business Owner of the Year Nicole Graham Emergency ID Australia

Business Owner of the Year was awarded to Emergency ID Australia founder Nicole Graham.

FIVE Hastings business women were recognised for their outstanding and inspirational success at the Hastings Business Women's Network Awards Gala last week.

Another three were honoured with the HBWN Tall Poppy Life Membership Award.

The gala saw more than 75 HBWN members and guests celebrate the success of their peers and the achievements of the network at Rose's Vineyard on Thursday.

Network president Kelly Lamb said winners exemplified what the HBWN stands for achieving success in business while supporting those around them.

Major sponsor of the awards, Port Macquarie MP Leslie Williams, has been a network member for the past four years.

"This exciting event has provided the opportunity to recognise, support and acknowledge many of the outstanding business women in our local community," Mrs Williams said.

Business Owner of the Year was awarded to Emergency ID Australia founder Nicole Graham.

Alex Glen-Holmes of Elders Real Estate was crowned employee of the year.

Young Business Woman of the Year went to Zoe Van Mill, of XYZ Support.

New Business Woman of the Year was awarded to Pix Jonasson of Success Dynamics Group.

Childish Photography's Kylie Biltris received the Judges' Commendation and Members' Choice awards.

Tall Poppy life membership was bestowed upon Peta Simmons of Bennetts Steel, Di Edgerley from Soft Edges and Caron Dyball of Snap Printing.

Wonderful Women of Wauchope 2012

Nicole is always very supportive of fundraising events for Cancer as she grew up with Cancer being a major part of her family’s life.

Nicole Graham is the founder and owner of Emergency ID Australia. Australia’s leader in Medical Jewellery and Emergency ID products, with the largest range and best quality, styles and service. They distribute to thousands in all areas and states – and it is right here in Wauchope!
Nicole is always very supportive of fundraising events for Cancer as she grew up with Cancer being a major part of her family’s life.

“My father was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s Disease on his 28th birthday, (when I was just 5 years old). With a young family, years of treatment, hospital admissions and many close calls and emergencies, this had a huge impact on both him and my family. I have always admired him for handling his Cancer with the utmost courage and selflessness, with his priority always to be an outstanding family man, cherishing our valued years and never complaining or losing his drive for life. He sadly lost his battle at the age of 43 (when I was 20 years old). During his 15 year battle I saw firsthand the impact Cancer has, and due to this I like to do what I can to support any efforts into reducing the impact of cancer for others in the future”.

Nicole commenced her business after seeing firsthand the real need for this vital information to be immediately accessible, as not only did she witness the needs her father had, but she also spent 13 years in the Police Force, and then personally experienced a serious heart condition causing her to need medical jewellery herself. Nicole is now very well and being self-motivated, determined and business minded she saw a real need for a quality product at an affordable price.

Alzheimer's Australia WA Ltd AT Information Sheet

Beneficial in situations such as: A person taken to hospital, lost, injured or ill, and unable to provide full identification details for friends or family to be contact.

Alzheimer's Australia is the peak body providing support and advocacy for Australians living with dementia. National Facts & Figures 2011.
* An estimated 269,000 Australians currently ilve with dementia.
* Without a significant medical breakthrough, that is expected to soar to about 981,000 by 2050.
* Dementia is the 3rd leading cause of death in Australia, after heart disease and stroke.
* 1 in 4 people over the age of 85 have dementia.
* Dementia is fatal and, as yet, there is no cure.
* Dementia is not a normal part of ageing.

As Seen in the AusBuy Guide

Emergency ID Australia is 100% Australian owned, operated and distributed Australia wide.

Emergency ID Australia is AUSBUY accredited and distributes Australia wide.

AUSBUY is the only organisation that represents Australian Owned businesses. That is the integrity of the AUSBUY brand.

AUSBUY is about:
* Empowering all Australians to work together to support our own,
* Giving Australians information about which businesses are Australian owned so that they can make balanced decisions about where they spend their hard earned dollars, and understand the consequences for now and future generations,
* Enabling ordinary Australians to spread the word about the real implications of foreign ownership.

Emergency ID Australia named one of Constant Contact's 2011 All Stars

“This group is really leading the charge when it comes to delivering relevant, engaging content that drives real business results. We salute this year’s All Stars for their success, and are honored to have played a part in their achievements.”

Emergency ID Australia, has received the 2011 All Star Award from Constant Contact®, Inc., the trusted marketing advisor to more than half a million small organisations worldwide. Each year, a select group of Constant Contact customers are honored with the All Star Award for their exemplary marketing results. Emergency ID Australia’s results ranked among the top 10% of Constant Contact’s customer base.

Emergency ID Australia, are the leaders in medical jewellery and emergency ID products throughout Australia. They specialise in custom engraved jewellery for people with medical conditions or who wish to carry vital emergency information on them. All jewellery is linked with a 24hr service to pass on detailed information to medical and emergency personnel, when needed.

“We are very pleased to be recognised by Constant Contact, for achieving strong marketing results and to be able to better manage customer relations. Engaging with our customers is vital to ensure we are adhering to their needs and receiving valuable feedback and communication with them.” Says Nicole Graham, founder and Director of Emergency ID Australia.

“There is nothing we like more than to see our customers finding success. It’s the reason Constant Contact was founded, and it’s a thrill to see the fantastic results that our All Stars are achieving,” said Gail Goodman, CEO of Constant Contact. “This group is really leading the charge when it comes to delivering relevant, engaging content that drives real business results. We salute this year’s All Stars for their success, and are honored to have played a part in their achievements.”

Medical Jewellery Awareness Month National Media Release 2012

Emergency ID Australia Medical Jewellery Awareness Month

I’m urging everyone to spread the word during Medical Jewellery Awareness Month – if you know a doctor, nurse or paramedic please ask them to keep a look out for medical jewellery on patients and you may help save a life.

MEDIA RELEASE – 16 AUGUST 2012 August is Medical Jewellery Awareness Month
Be aware – show you care – check for Emergency ID.

With the population ageing and allergies increasing, a growing number of Australians are choosing to wear medical jewellery featuring potentially lifesaving information; however, more needs to be done to ensure these details are discovered in emergency situations.

During Medical Jewellery Awareness Month this August people trained in first aid, emergency services personnel and healthcare workers are being urged to check if patients have bracelets or necklaces engraved with information that can save time and save lives.

Nicole Graham, Director of Australia’s largest medical jewellery provider, Emergency ID Australia, said sales had increased 40% over the past year, but the huge range of products on the market meant many people simply don’t know what to look out for.

“Medical jewellery is now attractive, comfortable and quite subtle, which is great news for the wearer, but also poses a challenge for emergency services, so education and awareness is the key,” Mrs Graham said.

“As part of Medical Jewellery Awareness Month, we’ve embarked on a national training initiative to encourage medical personnel to take a few seconds to check if the patient has emergency ID that could greatly improve their ability to provide care for that person".

“Emergency ID products have undergone major advancements over recent years, with thousands of Australians now wearing items that feature unique identification numbers providing access to on-the-spot health records and personal details via a 24 hour phone service."

A recent survey by Emergency ID Australia of more than 300 people who wear medical jewellery showed 90 per cent wear their jewellery “all the time - 24 hours a day” or “most of the time”. The survey also showed that the most important information they want others to have access to includes allergy information, medication lists and doses, and emergency contacts or next of kin details.

“Medical jewellery has always been popular with those with diabetes or serious allergies, but we’re now seeing a growing demand from the elderly, especially the 280,000 Australians currently living with dementia,” Mrs Graham said.

“With about 1 in 110 children now diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder, we’re also seeing an increase in sales of our kids range as parents look for peace of mind when it comes to the health and safety of their children.”

In 2011 Debbie Chilton, who has epilepsy and is confined to a wheelchair, was too scared to go out into the community alone and chose instead to isolate herself.

“My friends and medical team encouraged me to obtain a medical bracelet so that I could regain some of the independence I had lost,” Ms Chilton said.

“The medical jewellery from Emergency ID Australia has given me the confidence to get out and about and has enabled me to resume my community work, which has given me a sense of purpose again.

“Knowing that medical staff can access my details, especially the list of medications I take, and those which could prove fatal if administered, provides me and my family with real peace of mind.

“Unfortunately not all paramedics I have come into contact with know to look for my emergency jewellery or understand that they can call the 24 hour phone service to access my details.

“I’m urging everyone to spread the word during Medical Jewellery Awareness Month – if you know a doctor, nurse or paramedic please ask them to keep a look out for medical jewellery on patients and you may help save a life.”

About Emergency ID:
Emergency ID is an Australian owned and operated provider of medical jewellery and emergency ID products.

The business was founded by former Police Officer, Nicole Graham, who had seen firsthand the need for vital patient information to be immediately accessible in emergency situations.

At just 34 Nicole experienced a serious heart condition which required open heart surgery and sparked her search for affordable, attractive and potentially lifesaving medical jewellery.

After recognising the options were very limited, Nicole established Emergency ID Australia to provide greater product choice, and ultimately peace of mind, for Australians and their families.

People who benefit from medical jewellery and emergency ID include those with an existing medical condition, diabetes, epilepsy, allergies, dementia, children with special needs, those at risk of heart attack or stroke, athletes, those with mental illness or disabilities, and travellers.

Emergency ID’s product range includes bracelets, necklaces, key rings, lanyards, wallet cards, stickers, wrist bands and IDs for helmets, hardhats and shoes.

Ends
For further information, interviews with Emergency ID Australia Director Nicole Graham or medical jewellery wearer Debbie Chilton, or for high resolution images please contact: Michelle Newman on 0412 044 471 or michelle@newmancommunications.com.au